Exhibit features Orono artists

Orono fifth-graders Gwen Roux (left) and Barrett Buck stand in front of the exhibit that they and other young artists contributed to, which was included in an exhibition in Minneapolis. (Submitted photo)
Orono fifth-graders Gwen Roux (left) and Barrett Buck stand in front of the exhibit that they and other young artists contributed to, which was included in an exhibition in Minneapolis. (Submitted photo)
Orono fifth-graders’ art included in new Minneapolis show

By Sean Miner
The Pioneer

Some 75 pieces of art, across a broad range of media, comprise “WARM Guerrillas, Feminist Visions,” an exhibition that opened on Feb. 26 at the Grain Belt Bottling House in Minneapolis.

Offering, according to the Guerrilla Girls website, a “complex multi-layered look into the role of feminism today,” the exhibition includes works by founding members of the Women’s Art Registry of Minnesota and others.

All of the artists with work in the exhibit are adults, with one exception. A group of Orono fifth-graders collaborated on a work to give the exhibit some youth perspective.

“It was really interesting,” said Jim Buck, father of Barrett Buck, one of the fifth-grade artists who contributed to the piece. “It was actually kind of amazing that this piece that the kids did got included in this opening, because it was a bunch of very talented local and regional artists displaying their work, and then there was this eclectic piece from a group of fifth-graders from Orono.”

“The thing is, it fit right in,” added Buck.

Orono art teachers Jo-Anne Reske Kirkman and Laura Mayo curated the event. That’s how the joint work, described by Barrett as “kind of a collage-sculpture,” was included in the exhibition.

“It’s made up of different magazine pieces,” explained Barrett. “We cut pictures out of magazines and glued it on, then made a sculpture out of it.”

Resembling a dollhouse, the piece features those cutouts on each of its three floors. Many of the images take a form dictated by the shape of the cutout, rather than the original content the student found.

“I kinda wanted to do animals; I had a few animals, then I found a very pretty picture of lightning,” said Barrett. “I have the picture of a penguin…and other things that I thought were cute.”

The father and daughter attended the exhibition opening on Feb. 26. Buck said that Barrett, while excited to see the finished product she had contributed to, was more interested in the rest of the exhibit.

“Most of the time, she spent walking around and exploring,” said Buck. “She walked around the entire perimeter of both upstairs and downstairs, and took it all in.”

“She loved it,” added Buck.

All told, Buck was excited for the opportunity extended to Barrett to express herself, as well as the recognition that came with it, for her and the other students.

“I think it’s fun for a kid to get recognized for creativity,” said Buck of his daughter. “She’s got an artsy, whimsical way about her…she really enjoys seeing other people be creative too.”

“WARM Guerrillas, Feminist Visions” is open to the public and runs through Saturday, March 12.

Contact Sean Miner at [email protected]